Welcome to Environment Network Manawatu

The environment faces real and pressing challenges

You can be part of the solution.
 
Environment Network Manawatu is a network of over fifty member organisations that fosters and encourages environmental initiatives in the Manawatū, in areas ranging from sustainable living to wildlife conservation.
 
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  • Esplanade day 2020 !

    Esplanade day 2020 !

  • Esplanade day 2020 !

    Esplanade day 2020 !

  • Esplanade day 2020 !

    Esplanade day 2020 !

  • Esplanade day 2020 !

    Esplanade day 2020 !

  • Esplanade day 2020 !

    Esplanade day 2020 !

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International students engage with Palmy’s Plastic Pollution Challenge

A group of students from Kyung Hee University in Seoul, South Korea reached New Zealand considering it as an environment-friendly country with stunning landscapes. However, they have seen some disturbing stuff in the waterways during their litter sampling activity at three sites on Napier Road Drain - bottle caps, plastic wraps, polystyrene and more. The samples were bought to Massey, where they were sorted, weighed and recorded. The data gathered will be used to continue the buildup of a useful picture of the scale and impact of plastic pollution in Palmy’s urban streams.

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The students arrived in New Zealand as part of an international short course.  They will share some of their findings and recommendations at the Palmerston North Library on February 13.

Zarina was one of the students and she said she never collected plastic in her country, sorting the waste. It was interesting and useful to her, she said.

“People here care about the environment and get involved in action-oriented work. We are taking that spirit from here”.

“In Korea, we never had an experience like this. I was very much impressed”, said Hui Jung, a student from the group.

Another Korean student, Lee Dohyeon said that he wanted to clear the waterways in his hometown. However, there are no groups or movements there. Regional movements of the community like this are good to make a difference, he added.

The sampling event was coordinated by Massey University and Manawatū River Source to Sea, an initiative of Environment Network.  Manawatū River Source to Sea is on a mission to eradicate plastics from our vast network of waterways and regenerate healthy waterways.

 

volunteer of the month
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Taking pest control into own hands

With his tramping boots on and brimming with optimism, Manawatū River-Source-to-Sea volunteer of the month Ian Rasmussen works towards making New Zealand predator-free.   By dedicating his life to a pest-free future, Ian is banking on positive returns from an investment of his time and hard work to increase biodiversity.

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“I have got the opportunity of working and bringing more birds back into the Ruahine ranges. I noticed that the birds present across the Ruahine region are more than before.” It indicates that intensive predator control is making this area more of a haven for birds and other native wildlife.

Recognizing that the key to protecting and restoring our native biodiversity lies in encouraging a pest-free habitat, Ian is heavily involved in trapping programmes. His latest project is looking at expanding into the Ashhurst and Pohangina area.

 Ian has been involved with Ruahine Whio Protectors for over five years and has been closely involved with that project. "I’ve got the fitness currently to handle the sometimes-harsh elements of the Ruahine Ranges," he says. The project has got over two and a half thousand traps. He feels that the work that they do will improve the biodiversity values in the area.

Every organism eats to survive, but some living beings compete with our biodiversity. They attack the flora and fauna that must be protected. Hence, Ian feels that the work he does is worthwhile. "By trapping predators, we can enhance the biodiversity values within the Manawatū river catchment region. We are making a difference. It is never going to stop”.

“When my grandchildren ask about blue ducks, I must be able to tell them that a group of volunteers worked hard to make sure it does not disappear entirely. At least we tried bringing the duck back from the brink of extinction”.

Ian is encouraged by how dedicated volunteers are working together. Ian has linked up with Environment Network Manawatu’s “Manawatū-River-Source-to-Sea” initiative as they have been successfully establishing community groups to tackle gnarly environmental problems. Volunteers wanting to support predator-free initiatives can email coordinator@enm.org.nz.